Carbon dating on ancient artifacts

Carbon-14 dating is a way of determining the age of certain archeological artifacts of a biological origin up to about 50,000 years old.

It is used in dating things such as bone, cloth, wood and plant fibers that were created in the relatively recent past by human activities.

History, anthropology, and archaeology are three distinct but closely related bodies of knowledge that tell man of his present by virtue of his past.

Historians can tell what cultures thrived in different regions and when they disintegrated.

Radiocarbon is an isotope with two extra neutrons, created by cosmic rays interacting with nitrogen in Earth's atmosphere.

The isotope of Potassium-40, which has a half-life of 1.25 Billion years, can be used for such long measurements.Archaeology has undoubtedly enriched mankind’s history like no other science.There is a greater part of man’s unwritten past that archaeology has managed to unravel.Then, only exceptionally well-preserved, pristine samples can provide reliable dates.At Warratyi rock shelter in the Flinders Ranges, South Australia, which shows signs of the oldest human occupation of the country’s arid interior, the oldest sample – a fragment of emu eggshell – has been radiocarbon dated to 49,000 years with reasonable confidence.

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